"The life and times of Rosie the Riveter" ; 1982, Vol.

Rosie the Riveter: The Legend Lives On
Rosie the Riveter as she is known was an iconic legend in American culture. During World War II, many women were forced to take on jobs working in factories and ship yards. This was a turning point during America’s history, as the tables were turning and women began leaving their daily lives as house wives and stay at home mothers to pursue job opportunities to help support their families.

"Rosie the Riveter: A Review." , Feb1982, Vol.

"The life and times of Rosie the Riveter" , Fall83, Vol.

During this week’s theme, Lionesse is proud to bring to you some of the women of the days gone by who have impacted society or the world in some way, shape or form. Today, we are pleased to present the lovely “Rosie the Riveter” to you and give you a brief description of who this icon was – and why she has made such a huge impact on American culture.

"Life and Times of Rosie the Riveter." .

As American men were enlisted as soldiers, the work force called for more women to become workers, and nearly 6 million women decided to answer the call. Rosie the Riveter would go on to become a face for all of the American women who would become workers, taking on jobs only men would dare to tackle in those days.

"The life and times of Rosie the Riveter" , Dec2004, Vol.

Rosie The Riveter Hair Down | Rosie The Rivet...

The song’s lyrics pretty much described the part that the government was hoping women would play during wartime: "She's a part of the assembly line, she's making history, working for victory, Rosie the Riveter." There are also many advertising posters.

Rosie The Riveter Hair Down | Pin Up Hair Dow...

After this initial painting was done, everywhere tried to cast for the part of a real life Rosie the Riveter, and it wasn’t until finding a woman named Rose Will Monroe, who actually worked on bomber planes for a day job, that one of the most iconic women in history was discovered. When this real life Rosie the Riveter was discovered, and she became the face of the most famous Rosie the Riveter painting which adorned posters with the, ‘We Can Do It!’ phrase across the top.

Rosie The Riveter Hair Down | Rosie The Rivet...

Rosie The Riveter Hair Down | The Rosie the R...

But unlike the efforts to recruit Rosie the Riveter to the factory, this clandestine search targeted female mathematicians who would become human 'computers' for the U.S.

Rosie The Riveter Hair Down | Rosie The Rivet...

Rosie The Riveter Hair Down | Rosie The Rivet...

Recalling Tour Details. Our research suggests that students actually retain a great deal of factual information from their tours. Students who received a tour of the museum were able to recall details about the paintings they had seen at very high rates. For example, 88 percent of the students who saw the Eastman Johnson painting At the Camp—Spinning Yarns and Whittling knew when surveyed weeks later that the painting depicts abolitionists making maple syrup to undermine the sugar industry, which relied on slave labor. Similarly, 82 percent of those who saw Norman Rockwell’s Rosie the Riveter could recall that the painting emphasizes the importance of women entering the workforce during World War II. Among students who saw Thomas Hart Benton’s Ploughing It Under, 79 percent recollected that it is a depiction of a farmer destroying his crops as part of a Depression-era price support program. And 70 percent of the students who saw Romare Bearden’s Sacrifice could remember that it is part of the Harlem Renaissance art movement. Since there was no guarantee that these facts would be raised in student-directed discussions, and because students had no particular reason for remembering these details (there was no test or grade associated with the tours), it is impressive that they could recall historical and sociological information at such high rates.

Rosie The Riveter Hair Down | Rosie The Rivet...

Rosie The Riveter Hair Down | hair will be do...

J. Howard Miller’s World War II famous “We Can Do It!” propaganda poster (commonly known as the “Rosie the Riveter” poster) is an example of a design whose meaning has become misconstrued over time, as reported by Student, Sara Berkes.