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The study of English involves learning about language, history, usage, and the shifting cultural contexts within the English-speaking world. The English Department at the University of Georgia is a diverse scholarly community of over 40 faculty and 600 undergraduates who are committed to preserving, transmitting, and extending the rich cultural legacy of the English language. At the core of this mission lies the complex skills of reading and writing which help to develop critical and creative thinking, articulate self-expression, and a broad knowledge of literature.

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The culture of consumption: Critical essays in American history 1880–1980 ..

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The Collective Imagination explores the social foundations of the human imagination. In a lucid and wide-ranging discussion, Peter Murphy looks at the collective expression of the imagination in our economies, universities, cities, and political systems, providing a tour-de-force account of the power of the imagination to unite opposites and find similarities among things that we ordinarily think of as different. It is not only individuals who possess the power to imagine; societies do as well. A compelling journey through various peak moments of creation, this book examines the cities and nations, institutions and individuals who ply the paraphernalia of paradoxes and dialogues, wry dramaturgy and witty expression that set the act of creation in motion. Whilst exploring the manner in which, through the media of pattern, figure, and shape, and the miracles of metaphor, things come into being, Murphy recognises that creative periods never last: creative forms invariably tire; inventive centres inevitably fade. The Collective Imagination explores the contemporary dilemmas and historic pathos caused by this-as cities and societies, periods and generations slip behind in the race for economic and social discovery. Left bewildered and bothered, and struggling to catch up, they substitute empty bombast, faded glory, chronic dullness or stolid glumness for initiative, irony, and inventiveness. A comprehensive audit of the creativity claims of the post-modern age - that finds them badly wanting and looks to the future - The Collective Imagination will appeal to sociologists and philosophers concerned with cultural theory, cultural and media studies and aesthetics.

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The Collective Imagination explores the social foundations of the human imagination. In a lucid and wide-ranging discussion, Peter Murphy looks at the collective expression of the imagination in our economies, universities, cities, and political systems, providing a tour-de-force account of the power of the imagination to unite opposites and find similarities among things that we ordinarily think of as different. It is not only individuals who possess the power to imagine; societies do as well. A compelling journey through various peak moments of creation, this book examines the cities and nations, institutions and individuals who ply the paraphernalia of paradoxes and dialogues, wry dramaturgy and witty expression that set the act of creation in motion. Whilst exploring the manner in which, through the media of pattern, figure, and shape, and the miracles of metaphor, things come into being, Murphy recognises that creative periods never last: creative forms invariably tire; inventive centres inevitably fade. The Collective Imagination explores the contemporary dilemmas and historic pathos caused by this-as cities and societies, periods and generations slip behind in the race for economic and social discovery. Left bewildered and bothered, and struggling to catch up, they substitute empty bombast, faded glory, chronic dullness or stolid glumness for initiative, irony, and inventiveness. A comprehensive audit of the creativity claims of the post-modern age - that finds them badly wanting and looks to the future - The Collective Imagination will appeal to sociologists and philosophers concerned with cultural theory, cultural and media studies and aesthetics.

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Students achieve a basic knowledge of the history of art within the broader context of social, intellectual, and cultural history by taking survey courses; upper level art history; major elective courses within the humanities, sciences, and social sciences (excluding studio art and art history but including a foreign language through the fourth semester); and a second approved literature course in addition to the college requirement. The combination of these courses develops critical and rhetorical skills necessary for success in the field.

By John Keyse-Walker “Sun, Sand, Murder by John Keyse-Walker is a winner

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A set of six essays that variously illustrate or devolve from what the editors set forth--the origin of American consumer culture in three interrelated, late-19th-century developments: ""the maturation of the national marketplace, including the establishment of national advertising; the emergence of a new stratum of professionals and managers. . . ; and the rise of a new gospel of therapeutic release preached by a host of writers, publishers, ministers, social scientists, doctors, and the advertisers themselves."" This is the tenor, too, of Lears' No Place of Grace (1981) and other radical critiques; it approaches consumerism as a ""way of seeing"" in the Barthes/Berger/Williams vein; it is certainly an advance on the crude dichotomy between a manipulative elite and a passive public--which, nonetheless, the contributors often revert to. Three of the pieces represent proficient applications of the new formula: Lears on advertising and Bruce Barton, Christopher P. Wilson on mass magazines and Edward Bok, Fox on Middletown and Robert Lynd--the three individuals being utilized to suggest (with varying degrees of finesse) that consumerism's critics and supporters were one. Michael L. Smith, on the selling of the space program, is a lesser example of this breed. (""The appeal of the astronauts, like that of the Marlboro Man, rested in their capacity to combine the pioneering image of '150 years ago' with the forward-looking mastery of technological change. . . . Like the Marlboro Man's tattoo, the language of Apollo provided an illusory transitivity of experience."") The two outstanding pieces are not only jargon-free, and independently readable, they are polar opposites, Jean-Christophe Agnew offers a truly ""thick"" exploration of ""The Consuming Vision of Henry James""--from his childhood recollections of Barnum (""this market-wise balance of hedonism and detachment, of psychic investment and psychic withholding"") to the possessive relations of the principals in The Golden Bowl. Robert Westbrook produces a straightforward, stringently analytical accounting of ""Politics as Consumption"" from the 1890s to the present--taking interesting issue with election-authority Walter Dean Burnham, taking due note of social-science pollster Paul Lazarsfeld. . . and the limits of manipulative power. The collection as a whole will get academic mileage; several of the contributors have individual followings; and Fox's profile of Lynd can substitute for the bio that's lacking. On a sheer value scale, the disparate Agnew and Westbrook essays make it worthwhile.

Holt Lecture was presented by the WVU history department on April 11, 2011

By The New York Times, Will Shortz

In addition to core German and Russian language courses, students receive guidance from a faculty mentor to devise a curriculum geared towards specific career goals and intellectual interests. The department is comprised of specialists who integrate language teaching with literature, linguistics, film, history, philosophy, and culture studies as well as important aspects of both nation’s contemporary society, business, and politics. Students acquire critical tools to undertake independent inquiries into the field of German and Russian, form their own questions about cultural specificity and difference, and are highly encouraged to study abroad.